windowsxpIn an attempt to coax Windows XP users away from the aging operating system, Microsoft is now offering potential PC buyers a $50 gift card to the Microsoft Store if they buy a new computer. The company is also offering 90 days of free phone support, and has partnered with data migration company Laplink to provide users with an easy way to transfer their data from an old PC to a new one.

More than a decade since its release, Microsoft is ending support for XP in April, which means that users of the OS won’t get software or security updates to their computer. Any security flaws that attackers find after that point won’t be patched. Software users count on won’t receive updates, either.

While Microsoft is already launching an all-out campaign to try and convince people of how bad things will be for them once support for XP ends, the company also needs to get some users who have been able to hold on to the familiar XP interface onto Windows 8, which can be a difficult transition. Windows’s user interface has changed a great deal since XP launched, especially with the addition of the Metro-style interface in Windows 8.1.

Microsoft is clearly hoping that users who don’t feel comfortable with the new interface or are worried about losing data will be able to find some comfort with the new promotion.

For users who are just looking for a new computer, other PC buyers’ indecisiveness is their gain. The offer applies to any PC purchase through the Microsoft Store, so it’s possible for customers to get a little extra value out of their new computer purchase, even if they’re not upgrading their OS.

Comments

  • deadrose

    Until they reintroduce the flat folder view with thumbnails, I’ll be keeping XP on one computer. I have terabytes of graphics dependent on that view for easy identification.

    • Ryan Parrish

      Windows 8 does have thumbnail views, from small to extra large view.

      an example of extra large view: http://i.imgur.com/jF8D6wq.png

      • deadrose

        I’m talking about the folder view, not the file view. In XP you get a flat folder view which shows up to four thumbnails on it, without opening the folder. Or you can name one image folder.jpg and that will display on the folder. It provides a quick and effective visual labeling system for graphics files.

        In Windows 7 & 8, you get a “3d” view of a file folder, and can see the edges of a couple of images. The only way to view the contents is to open the folder.

        Did I explain myself more clearly that time or shall I provide screen shots?

        • Ryan Parrish

          That makes sense. I didn’t understand what you meant before. That’s not a feature I ever used so I wasn’t aware it no longer existed.

          • WaltD

            Microsoft Loves to have a great feature and then pull it back – On Windows Phoe 6.x, you could back up your txt messages from the phone to your PC – then they came out with Windows Phone 7 and there was no way to back up your txt messages! If you had to reset your phone, all previous txt messages were gone forever.

          • bobby

            you can backup to skydrive. even better and less “manual” work involved.

  • Mike

    $800 – $50 = $750 for 1 new Windows laptop.
    $750 / $250 = 3 Chromebooks OR 1 Chromebook a Nexus 5 phone and $100 to spend on music and videos at the Google Play store.

    • http://www.techmansworld.com/ Michael Hazell

      It doesn’t matter. Windows XP are going to look for a Windows replacement, usually.

    • Forrest Corbett

      A few years ago I had the choice between Vista and XP on a machine for my dad, and I went with XP. Now he’s looking again, and really a Chromebook is a great fit for him. Not just because of cost, but because it does what he needs it to do.

  • baligeko

    Yet again, another opportunity for people to successfully migrate to Macintosh or iPad.
    – I bought a Mac to avoid Vista
    – My father bought a Mac to avoid Windows8
    – My aunt bought an iPad because she is now scared of XP viruses
    – etc

Job Listings on GeekWork