Mary Meeker’s full Internet trends presentation: Mobile booming while online slows

kpcb-internet-trends-006Mary Meeker, the former Wall Street analyst now working at Kleiner Perkins, gave her highly quotable and tweetable Internet trends report today at the Code Conference.

The material is mostly all her own, meaning that her team gathers the data from various sources to find valuable information that many start-ups and tech giants will use to guide the ship.

Mary Meeker

Mary Meeker

Meeker’s main theme today may not be a huge surprise: She said the total number of Internet users in the world is growing by less than 10 percent per year, and is slowing. Meanwhile, the number of smartphone users is growing by 20 percent per year, although it is slowing, too.

What’s going gangbusters is mobile data traffic. That’s up 81 percent, mostly due to video.

We have the presentation embedded below for diving in deep, but here’s a few of the highlights if you don’t have the time to view 164 data-rich slides:

  • Tablets are seeing huge potential and are growing faster than PCs ever did, with shipments up 52 percent in 2013.
  • ARPU is usually used to find the average revenue per user for wireless carriers. But Meeker did the same for some of the big tech giants. They are as follows: Google ($45, up 8 percent); Facebook ($7.24, up 57 percent); Twitter ($3.55, up 80 percent).
  • Is there a bubble? Some valuations are up, but it’s not consistent. The Nasdaq is 18 percent below the March 2000 peak. The number of VC financings are also down 50 percent from the peak.
  • Same-day delivery is the next big thing: 47 percent of online transactions use free-shipping vs. 35 percent five years ago.
  • 1.8 billion photos are uploaded and shared everyday on Flickr, Snapchat, Instagram, Facebook and WhatsApp. In 2012, it was roughly 300 million.
  • Phones and tablets are outshipping TVs and PCs by 4 to 5 times.
  • 80 percent of China’s Internet users are mobile, creating a more critical mass than any place in the world.
  • Nine of the top 10 global Internet properties are U.S.-based, and 79 percent of their users are outside America.