OS X 10.10, better known as Yosemite, represents the next-generation in Apple’s desktop operating system. Yosemite brings a new look to the desktop experience, and also ties OS X and iOS together through a feature called Continuity that I bet will make work a lot easier for Apple users. Currently available as a preview, Yosemite is expected to be released later this year.

As with any big change, customers will wonder if their older hardware will be supported. We recently received this question from a reader named Steve:

Q: I’m excited to check out OS X Yosemite once it launches, the redesigned interface looks great! My MacBook Air is from 2010, and I was curious if you knew if it would run Yosemite without any issues, or if I have to upgrade my computer?

A: I agree — I think the look and feel of OS X Yosemite is a breath of fresh air. I’ve been using the Developer Preview since it was made available at WWDC 2014, and when I use a Mac that is running Mavericks or earlier, it already feels like a big step backwards from a design perspective.

Now, on to system requirements! The nice thing about Yosemite is that Apple hasn’t changed any of the system requirements from what was required to run Mavericks. In other words, all Macintosh products capable of running OS X Mavericks will be supported by Yosemite; as with Mavericks, 2 GB of RAM, 8 GB of available storage, and OS X 10.6.8 (Snow Leopard) or later are required to upgrade. To make it easier to figure out if you’re specific Mac is compatible, here is a listing of all the Apple hardware that is Yosemite-capable:

  • iMac Mid-2007 or newer
  • MacBook (13-inch Aluminum, Late 2008), (13-inch, Early 2009 or later)
  • MacBook Pro (13-inch, Mid-2009 or later), (15-inch, Mid/Late 2007 or later), (17-inch, Late 2007 or later)
  • MacBook Air (Late 2008 or later)
  • Mac Mini (Early 2009 or later)
  • Mac Pro (Early 2008 or later)
  • Xserve (Early 2009)

As you can see, anyone who has bought a Mac within the past five years is covered and will be able to run OS X Yosemite. Mac Pro, MacBook Air, and MacBook aluminum buyers as far back as 2008 are also good. In fact, some MacBook Pro and iMac buyers from back in 2007 can even get in on the Yosemite action, and those computers are now 7 years old! This is a pretty large blanket of Mac users that will be able to enjoy the next generation of OS X, and I comment Apple for including as many Macs as it did.

OS X 10.10 Yosemite is set to launch later this fall, and will be available exclusively on the Mac App Store. At WWDC, Apple announced that it will be made available completely free to its users. Can’t beat that!

Keep those questions coming — if you need help with a tech issue, let me know at askandru@gmail.com!

Andru Edwards is the Editor-in-Chief of Gear Live, tech startup consultant, and does speaking gigs focused on startups and social media. You can contact him on Twitter at @andruedwards, watch his technology videos on YouTube, subscribe to him on Facebook, and get perks for supporting his work on Patreon.

Comments

  • Forrest Corbett

    As usual, I think it’s more important to note what apps will not work – at least the major ones. A user isn’t going to accidentally install Yosemite. They may go to the App Store and simply not find it. It is much more likely that they go through the effort of installing it, only to find out some of their apps no longer work.

    While Yosemite is still in beta so this is all subject to change, a fair place to look for app compatibility is http://roaringapps.com/apps?index=a (no affiliation)

    And if you sort based on Mavericks, you can easily see there were a ton of apps that worked in Mountain Lion that didn’t work on Mavericks. So even though the system requirements didn’t change, what apps users could run on it certainly did.

  • rick gregory

    Note, though, that the Mac needs to support Bluetooth LE for Handoff to work with iOS devices. I’m not sure if it’s just Handoff or all Continuity features.

  • Brian

    http://www.apple.com/feedback/macosx.html – Tell them how terrible it is.

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