The Scrooglers have struck again.

scrooglededucation1
Microsoft compares Bing’s new ad-free search results in schools with Google.

First it was Google Shopping, then came Gmail which was followed by Google Play. Now, Microsoft’s latest attack on Google comes in the form of education.

The new Scroogled campaign is timed with Microsoft’s debut of Bing for Schools, a program allowing schools across the country to use an ad-free version of Bing that comes with added privacy protections and filtering tailored for students.

Microsoft touts the fact that when students use Google in schools, they see ads that can “distract from their studies.” That seems a little off to me — after using computers in school for the past decade or so, I can safely say that the ads on Google never took a toll on my education (Facebook and Twitter, however, are a different story).

The Redmond software giant lists some stats showing parental support for ad-free searches and posted a few side-by-side comparisons of searches done in Google and in Bing for Schools.

There is also a new dictionary definition Microsoft made up for Scroogled:

[skr•oo•gulld]verb
Word origin: Google’s ongoing use of invasive tactics to maximize their advertising profits.

5. The Google practice of serving up ads to students when they search using Google at school.

See also: advertising; distraction; inappropriate; interruption; marketing.

This is yet marks another chapter in the ongoing battle between the two tech kingpins. Learn more about Bing for Schools here.

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Comments

  • http://www.christopherbudd.com Christopher Budd

    It’s a real shame.

    I think many parents and educators would appreciate the ad free option. I personally think kids are advertised to way too much. So Microsoft’s offer of ad free with parental/safety controls (an area they’re strong in) is a really good thing.

    But then they have to go and blow a good thing with another one of these negative ads. It’s overplaying the hand. They had a great positive story that could stand on its own. And then by using this mud slinging again they ruin it.

    Put out the positive story and let the 3rd parties tell the negative story around Google (or anyone else).

    Like I say, it’s a real shame.

  • panacheart

    The schools really got micscroogled when Microsoft sold them sharepoint. Anyone else have kids in school that are forced to use that garbage? What a total waste of time and energy. Few of the teachers actually update their class information, so it’s not only useless, it’s counter productive as kids are held accountable for assignments not posted, and grades and updates are often later than the report cards that arrive in the mail.

    What’s really dangerous is Bill Gates trying to make schools into training ground for Microsoft, creating charter schools that function like MS internally, so kids are ready for the Microsoft style corporate environment. And yet somehow Google ads are distracting? That’s a stretch at best.

    Neither party is really altruistic. Both Microsoft and Google want to sell stuff to students and own their “mind share” when they grow up. At the end of the day it’s all about money, and which company gets it.

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