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amazonsignAmazon has some loyal customers inside Iran’s embassies around the world — but they won’t be buying items from the U.S. e-commerce giant any more.

In an unusual footnote this morning in its quarterly filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission, Amazon disclosed more than $100,000 in purchases of consumer products over the past three years by Iranian embassies and people “who may have been acting on behalf of these embassies.”

The filing references Iran’s embassies in Japan, Germany, France, Spain, Austria, and China and an Iranian government delegation in France.

“The consumer products included books, music, other media, apparel, home and kitchen, health and beauty, office, consumer electronics, and automotive products,” Amazon says in the filing. “We are unable accurately to calculate the net profit attributable to these transactions. We do not plan to continue selling to these accounts in the future.”

The purchases included $900 worth of items “for an individual designated under Executive Order 13382,” according to the filing. That executive order is “aimed at freezing the assets of proliferators of weapons of mass destruction and their supporters, and isolating them financially,” explains a U.S. State Department summary.

Amazon’s disclosure was made under the Iran Threat Reduction and Syria Human Rights Act, which prohibits a wide variety of economic activities with Iran as part of sanctions against the country.

Here’s the full text of the disclosure from the 10Q filing.

We recently determined that, between January 2013 and March 2016, we processed and delivered orders of consumer products for certain individuals and entities located outside Iran covered by the Iran Threat Reduction and Syria Human Rights Act as follows: consumer products valued at approximately $20,000 for Iranian embassies located in Japan, Germany, France, Spain, Austria, and China and an Iranian government delegation in France; consumer products valued at approximately $81,000 for individuals who may have been acting on behalf of these embassies; and consumer products valued at approximately $900 for an individual designated under Executive Order 13382. The consumer products included books, music, other media, apparel, home and kitchen, health and beauty, office, consumer electronics, and automotive products. We are unable accurately to calculate the net profit attributable to these transactions. We do not plan to continue selling to these accounts in the future.
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