Code.org co-founder Hadi Partovi speaks at the 2013 GeekWire Summit.
Code.org co-founder Hadi Partovi speaks at the 2013 GeekWire Summit.

More than two million students across the nation will learn how to code thanks to a Seattle-based organization that is on a serious mission to teach kids about computer science.

Code.org today announced partnerships with 30 schools districts — including three of the top 10 largest districts in the country — that will allow teachers to use the organization’s free computer science courses in elementary, middle and high school classrooms starting this fall. Funded by hundreds of donors, the non-profit organization will provide curriculum, professional development and mentorship support for teachers.

code4“We are delighted to bring computer science to our classrooms through our partnership with Code.org,” Robert Runcie, Superintendent of Broward County Public Schools in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, said in a statement. “This is a transformative moment for public education, where we must develop the ability of our students to learn new things and apply their understanding to solve real world problems. Computer science brings all of this together for us.”

Founded last year by brothers Hadi and Ali Partovi, Code.org offers free online learning courses that have been popular thus far, with more than 500,000 students signing up for the intro to computer science course in just one month. Code.org also hosted an “Hour of Code,” event this past December that encouraged kids to spend one hour learning how to code and reached 10 million students — half of them girls.

Check out the full list of partnering districts here. Washington-based districts include Bainbridge, Bremerton, Central Valley, Cheney, East Valley, Enumclaw, Highline, Shoreline, Spokane and West Valley.

On top of today’s announcement, Code.org has many more goals for 2014: Reach 100 million more students, have 100,000 teachers host an online course, and push 70 more districts in the U.S. to implement computer science courses.

Related: Code.org lets kids develop their own Flappy Bird game in 15 minutes

Comments

  • Eric LeVine

    Congrats Hadi!

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