Reporting its quarterly results this morning, Nokia said sales of its Lumia line of Windows Phones have surpassed its expectations in the U.S., but struggled in other some parts of the world.

The company posted a loss of more than $1.2 billion, caused largely by its struggling Nokia Siemens Networks unit, which took a big restructuring charge. At the same time, sales of Nokia’s new Lumia line of Windows Phones were unable to make up for declining demand for the company’s traditional Symbian smartphones, as it shifts away from that lineup.

(Note: Post corrected to accurately state the size of Nokia’s loss. Thanks to the reader below for the help.)

“We have launched four Lumia devices ahead of schedule to encouraging awards and popular acclaim,” said Nokia CEO Stephen Elop in a statement. “The actual sales results have been mixed. We exceeded expectations in markets including the United States, but establishing momentum in certain markets including the UK has been more challenging.”

Nokia said it sold some 2 million Lumia devices in the first quarter, up from 1 million in the fourth quarter, as the company launched its Windows Phone in more parts of the world. However, Nokia’s sales of smart devices, including phones, fell by more than 50 percent to 12 million units in the quarter.

Microsoft is banking on the Nokia partnership to revive its fortunes in the mobile phone market vs. the iPhone and Android. The companies recently launch the flagship Lumia 900 in the United States, and the device has been selling out online, in a sign of the positive reception.

Microsoft reports its quarterly earnings this afternoon.

More on Nokia’s results: New York Times, Bloomberg News, Associated Press.

 

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Comments

  • Guest

    Considering how much money and effort they spent in the UK, I have to believe that they’re pretty disappointed with these results.

    • Guest

      Disappointment is something that Nokia and MS should be getting used to by now.

  • columnbreak

    In the beginning of the second paragraph, it should be “loss of more than $1.2 billion,” not million.

    • http://geekwire.com Todd Bishop

      Thanks for the help, just fixed that and noted the correction.

    • http://geekwire.com Todd Bishop

      Thanks for the help, just fixed that and noted the correction.

  • Guest

    As Windows Phone continues to grow, and with Windows Phone 8 and Windows 8 dropping later this year, we expect Nokia to realize growth in these areas. I can’t think of any other platform designed to so seamlessly blend the mobile and desktop experiences.

  • http://twitter.com/jclaussftw Jason Gerard Clauss

    I’m glad to see a more vital third party competitor. Now we just need BlackBerry to come back. Four companies should keep the quality levels up. The duopoly just wasn’t working.

  • rocky john

    Nokia said it sold some 2 million Lumia devices in the first quarter, up
    from 1 million in the fourth quarter, as the company launched its
    Windows Phone in more parts of the world

  • 7 leaves

    I think that Nokia And MS must be patient and, mostly, offer their phone for low-mid price market. Why? iPhone was always expensive but always offered a high-quality product. Androids range from the sluggish $50,00 to higher than the iPhone. And that’s why Androids are, now, the majority OS in the world. So, MS must compete with a market filled with great phones, but lacking the environment that Google and Apple already have. That’s why they should consider launch the Lumia 710 with very low prices and let the WP development free of charges (like the Android).

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