Here’s a must-read chart for anyone who follows the mobile industry.

Nielsen today released new data for the U.S. smartphone market, showing not only usage by operating system but also the reach of individual device makers within each mobile platform. Android is at 51 percent of the market, Apple’s iPhone is at 34 percent and Blackberry is at 9 percent, but some of the more interesting factoids relate to Microsoft effort to rebound in the mobile market.

Overall, Windows Phone has 1.3 percent of the market, and Microsoft’s legacy Windows Mobile platform has 3 percent.

Nokia’s Lumia line of Windows Phones have captured 0.3 percent of the U.S. market, according to the data. Among the ranks of Windows Phone device makers, that puts Nokia behind HTC and Samsung, with 0.5 percent each.

Microsoft and Nokia launched the Lumia 710 on T-Mobile USA in January and the flagship Lumia 900 in April on AT&T. Both HTC and Samsung have had Windows Phone devices on the market for longer periods of time.

Overall, Nielsen says that two-thirds of Americans who bought mobile phones over the past three months opted for smartphones vs. standard cell phones.

Comments

  • guest

    Let’s just wait for Microsoft PR putting a positive spin here.

  • Mc

    Wow, this chart sucks. Graphically it’s completely inaccurate. For example, the two MS operating systems together have less than half of RIM’s market share, yet their combined graph area is about the same. RIM in turn has less than a third of Apple’s market share, yet is shown with more than half the area. Finally, Android and Apple together have 85% of the market, yet just over half the area of the graph. What a lousy graph.

  • guest

    I guess the only positive way of looking at that is most of the WP share is Nokia, who was effectively out of the US market. So it’s a comeback for them of sorts, albeit pretty modest, especially given how much they and MS have been spending on marketing.

  • SoldierII

    Well at least the graph looks like Metro by Microsoft. :)

Job Listings on GeekWork