Trending: They choose to avoid the moon: Anti-space event in Seattle urges Bezos and others to focus on Earth
Colette Courtion, founder and CEO of Joylux, emphasized the importance of a female presence in the healthcare market. Photo from Joylux.
Colette Courtion, founder and CEO of Joylux, emphasized the importance of a female presence in the healthcare market. Photo from Joylux.

Women’s health issues can be embarrassing to talk about, and difficult to treat because of a lack of specialized equipment. Pelvic floor weakening, which affects millions of women in the United States, is just one of these issues.

Joylux, a Seattle-based startup focused on women’s health technology, is completing a $2 million funding round in preparation for the U.S. launch of vSculpt, a device that treats pelvic floor weakening with sonic vibrations. It is an easier, quicker treatment than the traditional Kegel exercise, which requires a woman to manually contract the muscles over and over.

Recent investors include individuals who are part of Golden Seeds, a national group of investors focused on women-led projects. Joylux also brought on Heather Dazell, previously of Redmond-based Clarisonic, as the vice president of marketing to oversee the launch. Deborah Reisenthel, CEO of Palo Alto Health Sciences, also joined Joylux as a member of their advisory board.

“There are a lot of women that have been suffering from this issue, and it has been a fairly taboo issue to talk about,” said Joylux CEO Colette Courtion.

vSculpt launched in Canada earlier this year, and according to Courtion that launch has been successful. “This product is resonating with many women in Canada,” she said, adding that the taboo around discussing women’s health is beginning to change.

vSculpt is awaiting FDA clearance, but Courtion expects a U.S. launch later this year. The device was previously available for pre-sale in the U.S. for $345.

vSculpt, Joylux's first product, is a technological pelvic floor strengthener that: a direct contrast to other treatments, which are based on manual exercises. Photo from Joylux.
vSculpt, Joylux’s first product, is a technological pelvic floor strengthener that: a direct contrast to other treatments, which are based on manual exercises. Photo from Joylux.

“At this point I’m encouraged from the response we’ve got from investors, especially in light of this being an uncomfortable topic to discuss,” Courtion said. “But investors seem excited about the product and the brand.”

Courtion has been part of a broader discussion about how women’s issues are presented in business contexts, particularly when speaking to male investors. “My personal background of going through this, and being a mother, allowed me to connect with investors on a more personal level,” Courtion said.

Like what you're reading? Subscribe to GeekWire's free newsletters to catch every headline

Comments

Job Listings on GeekWork

Find more jobs on GeekWork. Employers, post a job here.