Fan_Matchup_Seahawks_49ers[2][4]Seattle has been full of nothing but Seahawks mania all week, but as far as the rest of the country goes, that just isn’t the case.

Seattle_SeahawksIn fact, according to an analysis of Facebook team page likes, nearly every other county outside of Washington state leans toward the San Francisco 49ers.

The heat map above shows which team has the most Facebook likes in every county in the U.S. and clearly, the 49ers are the favorite. The darker the shade, the more the county leans one way or the other.

The Pacific Northwest is heavy in blue, but everyone else — with the exception of a few counties in Colorado, Minnesota and Wisconsin — appears to favor San Francisco.

On the other hand, Twitter is seeing more “@Seahawks” activity than “@49ers,” mentions, for what it’s worth:

Here’s what how the AFC championship breaks down:

Fan_Matchup_Patriots_Broncos[2][4]

Comments

  • Kevin Simpson

    GO Seahawks!

  • Ron Grummer

    The bias is in basing considerations upon results obtained through a Farcebook survey.

  • 509

    Had lunch with a guy last Friday.

    He said that he roots for those teams that he is NOT paying for their stadiums.

  • Brian

    Facebook: Old and busted
    Twitter: New hotness

  • patroclus1

    Something is wrong here. I know Hawaii is SeaHawks country.

  • Guest

    That’s probably because Seahawks fans don’t use Facebook any longer. I’d assume a study of MySpace posts would show the 49ers covering most of the map too.

  • Rikki Doxx

    I quit FB and millions of others are leaving for Twitter. People are realizing they don’t want their personal lives in front of everyone and for FB to sell it to advertisers.

    • Guest

      I just got tired of reading rants by people. I found that G+ gives everything that FB did right, has everything Twitter has but with more depth and allows for groups so I can filter who see’s what. It’s a win all around. Besides, it just integrates with all my Google account stuff much better.

      • panacheart

        We must talk. You must be the one person on the entire planet who’s figured out how to make G+ work.

  • Guest

    Go Seagulls!

  • Natasha Jarmick

    Data from Facebook is extremely unreliable – as it can only pull a sample from people who have their statuses set to “public” – which most users do not. So…basically…not very accurate. Regardless… GO HAWKS

    • http://www.ColinChristianson.com Colin Christianson

      This isn’t even measuring mentions on facebook. It’s only looking at who liked each of the team’s pages. So definitely doesn’t tie to which team each region leans towards.

  • http://thinkspace.com Peter Chee

    #GoHawks. All that matters is a win by the home team today!

  • http://www.ColinChristianson.com Colin Christianson

    Well that was taken out of context. You’re metrics are ALL out of whack for what you’re trying to correlate. Facebook likes don’t equate to who’s rooting for which team. There are likely several people that have liked both pages. Given the population spread of California vs the Pacific Northwest, as well as the degrees of separation from SF to other major cities in the US compared to Seattle to other cities, it would only make sense there would be more likes to the 49ers page. But in the end that DOES NOT correlate with who’s leaning where online chatter measures that better. And to go deeper, sentiment analysis of the chatter.

    To more accurately measure who’s leaning which direction you’d have to measure mentions on facebook of the Seahawks and 49’ers then compare. But of course that’s hard to measure since facebook is closed off and you’d need access to each page’s insights to get the best view. That’s where twitter is a better measure of public interest and who’s rooting for who.

    You should use a geographical heat map based on twitter mentions for each with the top keywords for each region to see the sentiment. That would be MUCH more accurate to correlate with “Who’s rooting for who” or which team each region ‘leans’ towards.

    • Taylor Soper

      Thanks for the comment, Colin. I actually think Facebook likes can be a decent measuring stick to see what teams people root for. If I “like” the Seahawks’ team page on FB, it’s highly likely that I’m a fan of that team, and I like to read about news coming from the organization.

      Twitter is also a good measuring stick — which is why I included their statistics above — but I actually prefer the Facebook likes over Twitter mentions. Just because I mentioned the 49ers on Twitter doesn’t mean I’m rooting for them. But if I “liked” their page on FB? That’s a little different.

      I think you’re right about the sentiment analysis of social media updates — that would probably give us the best idea of who, based on location, is rooting for which team.

      • http://www.ColinChristianson.com Colin Christianson

        I see where you’re coming from. Especially when it does take a bit of time / money to create the data sets I am talking about and the analysis you used takes much less time. Still though, as “go hawks” points out below, the 49ers have a larger reputation over time and so many of those likes could have been years ago. That would mean the use of just likes has historic clout, access to population, and marketing confounding variables among others. If you’re going to use likes then it’d be best to look at where each page was 1 year ago and where they are today on likes in addition to overall likes. Then calculate the growth for each. There is still the confounding variables mentioned above in there, but it would give another dimension to consider.

        I noticed that many of the commenters misinterpreted the geographical image as chatter / mentions instead of likes. I think that is probably a common misinterpretation for most when reading the article. The title of the article predisposes the reader to think you’re talking about Facebook chatter / mentions.

        But again I get it. It’s an attention getting title and the facebook likes metric is the easiest to grab for Facebook. So know where you’re going to at least get the conversation going around this. And am glad since I love online metrics =)

  • imyourkelly

    Idaho and Montana got it right, according to the maps and the outcomes that is.

  • go hawks

    Its because the hawk’s or any seattle team has never won a championship except a basketball team a long time ago that we no longer have .people jump on a bandwagon and only go for teams that have won before

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