Zuckerberg leads list of most-liked CEOs; Bezos’ approval rating soars and Ballmer is a no-show in top 50

Mark Zuckerberg. (Photo by Robert Scoble via Flickr.)

Mark Zuckerberg. (Photo by Robert Scoble via Flickr.)

Do you like the job your boss is doing? If you work at Facebook, Amazon.com, Salesforce.com, EMC, SAP, Apple or Google, the answer to that question is a resounding yes.

The CEOs of those tech titans each scored approval ratings above 90 percent in Glassdoor’s annual ranking of the top highest-rated CEOs. (Glassdoor bases its ranking on reviews submitted to the site by employees).

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg led the pack with an approval rating of 99 percent (even though the company’s stock price is down by 27 percent since the IPO). Google CEO Larry Page’s approval rating stayed the same at 95 percent, while Amazon.com CEO Jeff Bezos — who continues to oversee meteoric growth at the company — jumped 13 spots on the list to finish with an approval rating of 93 percent.

While Apple CEO Tim Cook was in the top 20, his approval rating fell four points to 93 percent as he lost last year’s title as top ranked CEO.

Steve Ballmer

Steve Ballmer

Noticeably absent from the list: Microsoft boss Steve Ballmer. His approval rating for the past 12 months, based on 1,200 reviews, registered at 52 percent.

That may seem pretty awful, but it is better than some of his past showings. In 2011, Ballmer was near the bottom of the tech CEO list with an approval rating of just 35 percent.

Nonetheless, Ballmer is one of the few CEOs at a big tech company (over $100 billion market value) not to make the list.

It’s also worth noting that two Seattle retail CEOs who are making a huge push online also fared well. Blake Nordstrom of Nordstrom ranked 29th, with an approval rating of 90 percent. He was edged out by Howard Schultz of Starbucks, who posted an approval rating of 92 percent.

The complete list of Glassdoor’s 50 Highest Rated CEOs is below:

top50ceos

  • guest

    Ballmer has been so bad for so long, that nobody wonders if he’s MS’s John Sculley anymore. Instead they wonder if Tim Cook is Apple’s Steve Ballmer. His failures are now so numerous and apparent that only a board intent on putting blinders on could ignore them. And that’s just what MS’s will continue to do.

    • Terry Gregory

      With MS’s chokehold on OSs now broken wide open and the long term trend going the wrong way in almost all their businesses, nobody worth having would want to take the role anyway. A monster decline in revenue, earnings and stock price is imminent. No smart candidate is going to want to take the job in advance of that.