Here’s what Microsoft is paying its new CFO Amy Hood

amy-hood

Amy Hood

Microsoft’s newly appointed chief financial officer, Amy Hood, will start at an annual base salary of $570,000, along with Microsoft stock valued around $6.5 million based on today’s share price, according to regulatory filings from the company today and last week. That’s in addition to a potential cash bonus based on future performance.

Hood was named to the position on May 8, becoming the first woman to serve as Microsoft’s chief financial officer. She was previously the CFO of the Microsoft Business Division, which includes Microsoft Office. She has been with the company since 2002.

Peter Klein, who previously held the position of chief financial officer, received a salary of $580,000 in fiscal 2012, along with a bonus of $950,000 and stock awards totaling about $3.6 million, according to Microsoft’s proxy statement last year. Klein received a salary of $525,000 in fiscal 2011, his first full year in the CFO position.

Microsoft tells the Seattle Times that it likes to give a large proportion of top executive compensation in the form of stock awards, to better align executives’ interests with those of shareholders.

One exception is Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer, who owns nearly 4 percent of the company already and doesn’t receive stock-based compensation. His salary was $685,000 in 2012, with a bonus of $620,000.

  • guest

    “Microsoft tells the Seattle Times that it likes to give a large proportion of top executive compensation in the form of stock awards, to better align executives’ interests with those of shareholders.”

    It’s embarrassing that MS’s SLT is still peddling this bs. The experience of the past decade shows unequivocally that grants have not produced that result. On the contrary, MS’s senior executives have collectively made hundreds of millions of dollars off grants even as their massive failures and mistakes resulted in the company losing its industry dominance, revenue/profit/valuation leads, and half its market cap. Under the previous program, options, they’d have made nothing. Better yet, many might have left earlier because of that, thus sparing MS from further damage.
    If they really wanted to align executive comp with shareholders, not just pretend to, they’d move back to an options system like the 90′s, which not coincidentally is the last time MS stock actually performed.

    • http://www.facebook.com/scottmoore.seattle Scott Moore

      Microsoft made that move to clear its books of stock options. Many people weren’t cashing in the options because they were worthless, but they remained on the books as a liability. It was a way for them to steal a promise from employees and make money doing it.

  • SP

    considering the way Microsoft is growing or should I say stagnating, isn’t Ballmer a highly paid non performer. Why is that all the employees have pay for performance but the same is not applicable for the non performing CEO like Steve Ballmer. At one time he laughed at iPhone and continues to do so on his other competitors who are royally kicking his back side

  • http://www.mediacritiquer.com/ MediaCritiquer.com

    iPad Office app please.

  • Bill Ballmer

    Microsoft has become a joke. They should write a book about corporate politics.

  • FutureFox

    I always thought these guys had much higher salaries. Good to know.