We’ve got a double helix bridge, but Taipei is building a double helix skyscraper

The double

The double helix bridge in Seattle. Photo via Chas Redmond

Seattle residents are familiar with the double helix pedestrian bridge, connecting Elliott Avenue with the Amgen campus to the west. But now check this out.

Construction just started in Taipei on a 20-story building called Agora Garden that has two sections that intersect much like the double helix, the fundamental structure of DNA.

But there’s more. The building also will double as an urban farm, with orchards, organic vegetable gardens and other medicinal gardens. Developed by the architecture firm of Vincent Callebaut, the residential tower is set to open in 2016. The architects write:

Such as a living organism, the tower becomes metabolic! It overpasses its energy-consuming passive role (absorbing all the natural resources and rejecting only waste) to produce its own organic food.

The architectural concept is thus to eco-design an energy self-sufficient building, whose energy is electric, thermal and also alimentary.

You can see more photos of the building here.

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  • http://twitter.com/corengi Corengi

    Very cool building – but it appears to fail on mimicking DNA in one area. The helix for the building is left-handed, whereas DNA is a right-handed helix. (More info here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helix).