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The Bezos Expeditions team recovered pieces of the Apollo F-1 engines in March.

Back in March, Amazon.com founder Jeff Bezos and his Bezos Expeditions team recovered significant pieces of two F-1 rocket engines that were used to launch rockets into space 40 years ago on the landmark Apollo missions, before plunging into the ocean.

Bezos’ F-1 Recovery Project team brought the parts to Kansas and now, after two months of cleaning and restoring, you can now check out the conservation efforts of the engines in person at the Kansas Cosmosphere and Space Center if you happen to be around Hutchinson, Kan., beginning this Friday.

The Apollo F-1 Conservation Project is commissioned by Bezos Expeditions and visitors will be able to see the engine artifacts. A conservation team at the Space Center has spent the past few months cleaning the more than 25,000 pounds of rocket engine pieces that Bezos and his team recovered in March. The plan is to preserve, document and reconstruct the historic engine parts.

Check out Collect Space’s write-up for more details on the conservation efforts. Photos and captions below are courtesy of the Kansas Cosmosphere and Space Center.

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Jerrad Alexander, SpaceWorks Technician, working on the LOX (liquid oxygen) Dome. Each component undergoes daily treatment with freshwater and anti-corrosion agents to remove ocean debris and prevent further decay.
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Jerrad Alexander, SpaceWorks Technician, uses a fine brush to clean an Apollo F-1 Thrust Chamber. In the background, you can see mist from one of the fine sprays that continually treats the artifacts with freshwater to remove ocean debris.
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Jerrad Alexander, SpaceWorks Technician, working on the LOX (liquid oxygen) Dome. Each component undergoes daily treatment with freshwater and anti-corrosion agents to remove ocean debris and prevent further decay.
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Jerrad Alexander, SpaceWorks Technician, examines an Apollo F-1 Thrust Chamber.
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Jim Franko, SpaceWorks Technician, working on an Apollo F-1 Thrust Chamber. The components are undergoing cleaning with freshwater and anti-corrosion agents to remove ocean debris and prevent further decay.

Previously on GeekWire: Images: Amazon.com wants to build a massive biosphere in Seattle (perfect for workers and mature trees)

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Comments

  • http://www.facebook.com/brant.williams Brant Williams

    I love this stuff. Have since I was a tyke. Thanks for the nice distraction.

  • Guest

    Allen with his V-2, Bezos with his F-1.

    Competing to see who’s got the bigger rocket?

    Is this about science or something else, really?

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