One of the key things we’ll be closely tracking on Tuesday during Amazon.com’s earnings call will be the overall performance of the company’s Kindle line, specifically the recently introduced Kindle Fire. Historically, Amazon hasn’t presented many specifics about sales of individual products, but that’s not stopping financial analysts from tossing out their projections.

And one analyst, Jordan Rohan of Stifel Nicolas, just upped his projections on fourth quarter Kindle Fire sales from an estimated five million to six million. Rohan contends that Amazon.com’s attractive price on the Kindle Fire, $199, is helping it win customers.

“Amazon’s device proliferation strategy has broader implications than most appreciate,” Rohan wrote in a research note. “Tablets including iPad and Kindle Fire are rapidly taking share from PCs and notebooks. Kindle Fire has staked out an important market position due to its loyal Amazon customer base and attractive (low) device pricing. We believe the lower hardware price will correlate with high e-book and video content attach rates.”

The report comes just a few days after Apple reported its own blockbuster quarter, surprising some analysts by selling a whopping 15.43 million iPads. Asked about the rise of the Kindle Fire on the earnings call last week, Apple CEO Tim Cook said that “we don’t really see the limited function tablets and e-readers as being in the same category.”

But the Kindle Fire certainly is spreading. Take a look at this graphic of Android-based tablets, which shows how the device has gained adoption in a short few months. User application sessions for those using a Kindle Fire now stands at 35.7 percent, just ahead of the Samsung Galaxy Tablet at 35.6 percent, according to Flurry Analytics.

Shares of Amazon are down nearly two percent in advance of the earnings announcement.

Previously on GeekWireAmazon.com: What to watch in this week’s pivotal earnings report

Comments

  • Guest

    Hmmm, 15M iPads and 6M Fires during the quarter, not to mention millions of other Android tablets. But I doubt that had anything to do with Windows revenue being down 6% and profit down 11%. /s

    “We’re not being disrupted”
    – Frank Shaw

    Right.

  • http://twitter.com/crenelle MichaelBrianBentley

    Are there concrete numbers for the number of any brand of tablet sold that are mentioned in the pie charts above? Also, you don’t provide an actual number for user application sessions. With the information provided, the pie charts shown could make equal sense if Samsung just sold 10,000 tablets.

  • http://twitter.com/crenelle MichaelBrianBentley

    Are there concrete numbers for the number of any brand of tablet sold that are mentioned in the pie charts above? Also, you don’t provide an actual number for user application sessions. With the information provided, the pie charts shown could make equal sense if Samsung just sold 10,000 tablets.

  • http://twitter.com/WaltFrench Walt French

    If the Kindle is most importantly an Android tablet, how come it zoomed into prominence versus other tablets at its same price?

    Sure looks like it’s not (a) Android, nor (b) $199-$249 that matters. In fact, it’s (1) full-function tablets with the Apple ecosystem; (2) low-cost tablets with the Amazon ecosystem; and (3) ratty tablets with a joke, malware-infested “ecosystem.”

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