Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer. (Microsoft photo)

Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer has signed on as an investor in a bid to build a new sports arena in Seattle, aiming to attract NHL and NBA franchises to the city.

Chris Hansen, the hedge-fund manager who is leading the effort, disclosed Ballmer’s name in an interview a few minutes ago on KJR sports radio. Also part of the group are Erik and Pete Nordstrom, two of the brothers behind the Seattle-based retailer.

All three of them are great people — not only are they big basketball fans and big NBA fans, but more importantly they’re big supporters of the community,” Hansen said on the Mitch in the Morning show. “It’s about doing something great for the city.  I think their interest speaks for itself. … They’re just supportive owners and we want to have a low-key ownership group.”

Hansen also revealed the Ballmer and Nordstrom names in a letter to public officials in Seattle and King County, reports the Associated Press. KING5.com has a copy of the letter.

The Sonics were moved out of town in 2008 and renamed the Oklahoma City Thunder — a team currently leading the Miami Heat 1-0 in the NBA Finals. On the show this morning, Hansen talked about how satisfying it would be for fans to see a new Sonics team take on the Thunder at a new arena.

Hansen has been acquiring property south of downtown Seattle and seeking approvals for a proposed multipurpose arena.

Ballmer, known for his intensity on the basketball court, has long been rumored to be interested in backing a bid to bring NBA basketball back to Seattle, but his role as Microsoft CEO would probably prevent him from being the primary leader of such an effort. Speaking at the Seattle Rotary Club last year, Ballmer made it clear that he had studied up on the issue.

“I think the challenges there are real estate challenges, honestly,” Ballmer said at the time. “I am not talking about where the location has to be, or anything else. But the building that is Key Arena would not be able to have an NBA team in it that would be competitive. The simple economics are: If you don’t have a nice enough building, you can’t sell enough of the right kind of tickets at the right kind of prices. And if you can’t do that, you can’t pay the players the right amount of money to compete. And if you can’t compete, you can’t fill the seats.”

Comments

  • Guest

    Thank you to Steve, Erik, and Pete for investing in Seattle’s sporting future! A privately-funded arena would improve Seattle’s appeal and revenue without adversely affecting our city’s budget.

  • Guest

    May Steve soon move on to his real passion in life, basketball, full time and free MS’s board to finally find a CEO capable of arresting Microsoft’s long standing decline in relevance and competitive position.

  • Ballard_Fisherman

    Awesome!

  • StanM

    Wait… did he just say getting Steve Ballmer involved would help him create a low-key ownership group??

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