Microsoft suddenly has a new competitive obstacle in its effort to rebound in the smartphone market. And its name is … Bada?

Yep, the little-known mobile operating system from Samsung Electronics topped Microsoft’s Windows Phone in worldwide smartphone OS market share in the second quarter, according to data released this morning by the Gartner research firm.

Not that it was very difficult to do: Microsoft came in at 1.6 percent of the market (down from 5 percent a year ago). Bada registered 1.9 percent, from less than 1 percent last year.

Android continued its meteoric growth, with more than 43 percent market share, up from 17 percent a year ago. Symbian was in second place, at 22.1 percent, followed by iPhone at 18.2 percent and RIM BlackBerry at 11.7 percent.

Microsoft is counting heavily on its partnership with Nokia to help reverse its fortunes. As recently as April, Gartner said it expected Windows Phone to rebound to 19.5 percent of the market by 2015, ahead of iPhone. Microsoft will also refresh Windows Phone this fall with an update known as Mango.

CEO Steve Ballmer told the company’s partners recently that Microsoft has “gone from very small to very small” in the phone market. “But it’s been a heck of a year, and you’re going to see a lot of progress in that market competitively as we move forward,” he said.

Nokia remains the largest maker of mobile handsets but saw its share of that market fall below 23 percent in the second quarter, from more than 30 percent in the same quarter last year.

Comments

  • Guest

    This is healthy behavior as legacy Windows Mobile devices — those bulky inelegant devices with names like “HTC Touch Pro II” — die out and are slowly replaced with Windows Phone 7 devices. The upcoming “Mango” release addresses many of the shortcomings with Windows Phone 7 and should continue to spur adoption in the corporate arena where, frankly, nobody ever got fired for buying Microsoft.

    • Guest

      Keep dreaming

      • Guest

        Not dream, it will be real.

        • Anonymous

          Mango isn’t going to change anything. It has the same UI and is basically the same OS as WP7.0 that the buying public have rejected.

          • bob dole

            The “buying public” haven’t had a chance to get their hands on it really because of the retailer issue surrounding it.

            the UI is perfect.. but there are many missing things around the OS that all other phones have.. and that is what “Mango” is adding and more. But Microsoft can’t simply just release 1 wave of handsets a year and have updates that are bi-yearly and hope to stay relevant. If they can get past their caveman ways then they will succeed.. if they continue on this turtle speed path.. they aren’t going to gain anything.

          • Guest Person

            “Perfect”?  LOL.  Nothing is ever perfect in terms of software and hardware development.  There is ALWAYS room for improvement.  I do agree that Microsoft desperately needs to up their game drastically.  But, in order to do that, they need to stop pushing .NET.  That technology is bogging them down.  And no one I know wants to develop in .NET.

  • Guest

    Astonishing.
    A psychopath has eloped from a psychiatric hospital.
    And he will manage to make Nokia sink.

  • Guest

    Astonishing.
    A psychopath has eloped from a psychiatric hospital.
    And he will manage to make Nokia sink.

  • Guest

    Astonishing.
    A psychopath has eloped from a psychiatric hospital.
    And he will manage to make Nokia sink.

  • Anonymous

    Windows Phone is dead, Steve Ballmer about to announce end of production.

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