Washington state ranks second for entrepreneurs

The venture capital totals may be falling, but Washington state is still a great place to start a new business. That’s the latest finding from the The State Entrepreneurial Index, which measures a state’s percentage growth and per capita growth in business establishments, its business formation rate, the number of patents per thousand residents and gross receipts of sole proprietorships/partnerships per capita.

According to the study, conducted by the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Washington state ranked second in terms of entrepreneurship.

Oregon also fared well, rising from 45th in 2008 to fifth in the latest study. New York state was at the top of the list, with Massachusetts and New Jersey rounding out the top five.

We certainly have a number of entrepreneurs in the GeekWire community, so what do you think of the results?

Here’s a look at a graphic showing how the states performed.

 

  • Guest

    I wouldn’t extrapolate much from this.  Oregon rising 40 spots?  Had to be from the growth in food carts in Portland.    Nevada falling 40 spots?  That’s probably from independent contractors (entrepreneurs, technically by the data) who moved onward when the housing and construction bubble burst.

    Does this tell us anything about innovation and technology entrepreneurship?

    Nope.

    But, I’ll bet that doesn’t stop people from quoting it.

  • Rangoski

    I am baffled to note that Calofornia is nowhere near the top. Every other friend I have in the Silicon Valley is an entrepreneur or a wannabe entrepreneur.

    • http://thinkspace.com thinkspace

      Seems like when measured per capita in business establishments it throws the State of California down lower. Silicon Valley probably is at the top if calculated at a city level.

      • http://twitter.com/fostermarkd mark foster

        Silicon Valley is a city now? 

  • Guest

    Congratulations to Washington on this accomplishment!

  • http://www.thoughtful.co Chris Lynch

    This doesn’t necessarily mean tech startups. Startup is a very broad term and us techies tend to claim ownership of the term, but as another commenter mentioned, a startup could be a street food vendor in Portland to a roofing company to a hot new photo sharing site. In other words, while we might rank high, I think if we narrowed the focus to tech, you’d see these results vary drastically.

    Everyone in tech knows California is where the majority of action is at, and NY is seeing a huge uptick as well. Our investments here in startups are fairly flat (http://www.geekwire.com/2011/seattle-venture-capitalists-remain-optimistic-dollar-volumes-slump) while they are up in California. There is a thriving community here, but I don’t hear of  many startups saying they need to move from the valley to Seattle to get funding :)

  • http://www.thoughtful.co Chris Lynch

    This doesn’t necessarily mean tech startups. Startup is a very broad term and us techies tend to claim ownership of the term, but as another commenter mentioned, a startup could be a street food vendor in Portland to a roofing company to a hot new photo sharing site. In other words, while we might rank high, I think if we narrowed the focus to tech, you’d see these results vary drastically.

    Everyone in tech knows California is where the majority of action is at, and NY is seeing a huge uptick as well. Our investments here in startups are fairly flat (http://www.geekwire.com/2011/seattle-venture-capitalists-remain-optimistic-dollar-volumes-slump) while they are up in California. There is a thriving community here, but I don’t hear of  many startups saying they need to move from the valley to Seattle to get funding :)

  • http://twitter.com/kilogrammatic Kelly Graham

    As pleased as I am that WA is #2, I would really love to see a measure of tech entrepreneurship specifically. Regardless, Oregon’s leap from 45 to 5 is impressive by any measure.

  • http://www.timbersoftware.com Lewis

    I don’t find the results credible at all.  California smack dab in the middle when it comes to entrepreneurship?  +1 to Thinkspace on “per capita” influencing results.  I also think “Patents per thousand residents” also skews the results.  I imagine Microsoft must be granted lots of patents per year.