Verizon's Bobby Morrison at WTIA TechNW 2011

Microsoft’s Windows Phone has been a recurring theme at the Washington Technology Industry Association’s TechNW conference this morning in Seattle. Especially among the local audience, clearly there’s a lot of interest in the Redmond company’s mobile comeback bid.

But the comments from speakers across the mobile industry make it clear that the jury is still out on the company’s prospects even for becoming a solid No. 3 behind Apple’s iPhone and Google’s Android. That’s even taking into account Microsoft’s partnership with mobile phone giant Nokia.

“That third spot seems to be a jockeying spot that many are kind of playing for,” said Bobby Morrison, president of the Pacific Northwest region for Verizon Wireless. “Who rises to the No. 3 position, I think time will tell.”

Apart from Windows Phone, Morrison said he believes Research in Motion has “heard the market clearly” and is making the necessary changes to innovate. Without going into details, he also cited a possible wild card of mobile phone manufacturers coming up with their own new rival in mobile platforms.

The topic also came up on a subsequent panel. At least at the outset, Microsoft’s Nokia deal will clearly result in more Windows Phone sales, given Nokia’s size, said entrepreneur Michael “Luni” Libes of Mobile Intelligence Solutions. However, it’s still not clear if the same panel in five years would be talking about Microsoft with the same degree of interest.

That said, the Nokia deal is critical for Microsoft to be considered a legitimate player. Bryan Trussel, the CEO of mobile location startup Glympse, said his company wouldn’t be looking seriously at Windows Phone as a platform if not for the Nokia deal.

Comments

  • http://www.facebook.com/rwoan Ronald S Woan

    Given iPhone 4 at $99 and iPhone 3GS free on three of the four major US networks now, it remains to be seen if number 3 is even relevant anymore… What is number 3 is/becomes less than 5% market share? Will there be an ecosystem?

    • RayH.

      #3 will be relevent, and talking about eco-system – Windows Phone has one of the better ones : MS Office as a built in app – Xbox live for gaming – Zune pass for music, bing for search – its pretty awesome, and dont forget that by next year it will be total integration through out.  From the phone to the xbox to the computer.

      • http://profiles.google.com/nxwkev kevin zhang

        dont forget skydrive and messenger intigration!

    • Guest

      You mean like Mac’s worldwide market share?

  • Guest

    “a possible wild card of mobile phone manufacturers coming up with their own new rival in mobile platforms.”

    That hasn’t worked out too well in the past. And isn’t RIM likely to adopt Android? That would exclude them from being a third option.

  • Anonymous

    The many reviews I have read favor WP7 over Android, and many over iOS as well.  Coupled with Android’s malware, quality, and fragmentation problems, leaving a door open to go through.  Once the hardware really starts rolling, MS throws millions into advertising, and their store shelves are stocked with enough quality apps, the consumers will follow.  MS has done a good job with WP7 (I didn’t think they had it in them), and the sales will follow.

    • http://twitter.com/TweetingAC Andrew Collins

      There are many “ifs” involved with WP7. The talking points are mostly hypotheticals. I’m starting to think Blackberry has a better chance at a comeback than WP7/Nokia being a major player.

      I’ve always thought MSFT should have branded their mobile offering with XBOX and not Windows. The psychological connotations between XBOX and Windows are “fun/new” versus “forced/stale” respectively.

      • Yetter

        There is only on “if” and that is whether or not MSFT is finally going to launch a really marketing campaign.  They have the strongest eco-system and have built an extremely solid and stable OS that can run quick and smooth even on outdated hardware.

  • Jdogbellevue

    If Microsoft would make this phone also for the business market (currently it limits you to 1500 contacts in your address book) it would have a better chance. Android has 35K.

  • Jdogbellevue

    If Microsoft would make this phone also for the business market (currently it limits you to 1500 contacts in your address book) it would have a better chance. Android has 35K.

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