NBC Nightly News TV anchor Brian Williams thinks Apple co-founder Steve Jobs should be Time’s Person of the Year, noting in remarks this week that the iconic entrepreneur “changed our world.”

Williams noted during his nomination speech:

“Not only did he change the world, but he gave us that spirit again that something was possible that you could look at a piece of plastic or glass and move your finger– that’s outlandish,” said Williams. “You could make things bigger or smaller like that. ‘Oh the places you’ll go’ and oh the way you will change forever the music and television industries. So may he rest in peace, Steve Jobs, and the spirit he represents, are my nominee for Person of the Year.”

Chef Mario Batali, who also served on the panel, agreed with Williams’ nomination. “I’m definitely a part of the fact and the belief that smartphones, the cell phone with photographic capability, has changed the world as much as the Bible has,” he said.

If chosen, Jobs would be the first person in the magazine’s history to receive the honor posthumously.

He’d also follow a long line-up of technologists who’ve received the honor, including Amazon.com founder Jeff Bezos, Intel co-founder Andry Grove and Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates, his wife Melinda and singer Bono.

Jobs probably would get our nod, though it may be unlikely that Time’s editors will choose another technologist given that Facebook co-founder Mark Zuckerberg received the honor last year.

At an event hosted by Time magazine this week, other panelists suggested the Tunisian fruit vendor who was credited for kicking off the Arab Spring and “angry people.”

What do you think? Should Jobs get the nod as Time’s Person of the Year?

Comments

  • http://twitter.com/Seattle_Startup Seattle Startup

    Absolutely NOT.  He created some great products and made billions.  But he refused to acknowledge paternity, treated people like crap and made no truly significant non-business (e.g. nonprofit) contribution to the world.

  • http://twitter.com/Seattle_Startup Seattle Startup

    Absolutely NOT.  He created some great products and made billions.  But he refused to acknowledge paternity, treated people like crap and made no truly significant non-business (e.g. nonprofit) contribution to the world.

    • Sylvia

      There are a lot of “good” and decent people out there who never make it to the “People of the Year” list and yet they continue to be good and decent for the rest of their lives. This so-called list is not the end all and be all. If they want to nominate certain people for their publication, so be it. If you disagree, don’t buy their magazine. I happen to think Steve Jobs deserves the credit but I also recognize they’re not putting his name in the Bible. Relax!

      • http://twitter.com/Seattle_Startup Seattle Startup

        I was just answering the question.  It’s not a matter of buying their magazine, it’s a matter of what the award represents and much of it doesn’t match Steve’s background.   Role model for creating a very successful business developing great and successful products yes …. role model for “person of the year” hardly.    And I am relaxed, thanks.

    • Sylvia

      There are a lot of “good” and decent people out there who never make it to the “People of the Year” list and yet they continue to be good and decent for the rest of their lives. This so-called list is not the end all and be all. If they want to nominate certain people for their publication, so be it. If you disagree, don’t buy their magazine. I happen to think Steve Jobs deserves the credit but I also recognize they’re not putting his name in the Bible. Relax!

  • Guest

    Steve Jobs does not deserve to be Time’s Person of the Year. In 2011 he released only minor improvements to extant products. Perhaps he should retroactively displace whomever was 1998’s Person of the Year in recognition of the iMac, perhaps the first “personal computer” of the modern era.

  • Guest

    Should he get nominated?  Sure, why not?  In terms of lasting impact, number of biz sectors disrupted/redefined, no question he qualifies.  Being a saint is not (as demonstrated many times) a requirement for being named person of the year.

  • Guest

    Should he get nominated?  Sure, why not?  In terms of lasting impact, number of biz sectors disrupted/redefined, no question he qualifies.  Being a saint is not (as demonstrated many times) a requirement for being named person of the year.

  • jvc

    Do you deserve to ask the question? How have you changed the world?

    • Guest

      Gotta love iTards. Were you asleep the day they taught how to play well with others?

      • Guest

        Were you?

        Please don’t use “retard,” or any portion thereof, in comments. As a man with compassion for the developmentally disabled, I find it offensive.

    • Guest

      Gotta love iTards. Were you asleep the day they taught how to play well with others?

  • http://ClaussConcept.com Jason Gerard Clauss

    Jobby definitely wouldn’t merit it on the basis of personal goodness, but then again neither did Putin or Zuckerberg. In sheer terms of influence this year, he still doesn’t merit the title. Perhaps in 2007 with the iPhone, 1998 with the iMac, or of course 1984 with the actual Mac.

    • http://twitter.com/Seattle_Startup Seattle Startup

      Argument could be made the Xerox PARC deserves all the business credit that is heaped on Jobs (and for that matter Gates).  Jobs (and for that matter Gates) are just better business people at taking other people’s good ideas and making billions off them.  At least Gates has done major goodness with his billions.

  • http://ClaussConcept.com Jason Gerard Clauss

    Jobby definitely wouldn’t merit it on the basis of personal goodness, but then again neither did Putin or Zuckerberg. In sheer terms of influence this year, he still doesn’t merit the title. Perhaps in 2007 with the iPhone, 1998 with the iMac, or of course 1984 with the actual Mac.

  • Guest

    Does anybody? There have certainly been worse choices in the past.

  • Froy L

    NO, NO, NO. He was not a very good person. NO

  • Anonymous

    No.

  • Brent

    This year is has to go to the guy that lit himself on fire in Tunisia.  I think he changed the world more than anyone else this year.

    • Beth Evans4

      I agree that it should go to someone involved in the Arab Spring. However, I wouldn’t be surprised if it went to Jobs.

  • Don Olson

    … that you could look at a piece of plastic or glass and move your finger– that’s outlandish

    Taken out of context, this is a really silly statement, but if it gets him the PoTY vote…

  • Guest 33

    No.

    Smart guy.  But, NOT a person of the year.  While many a villain have graced the cover and earned such notoriety…it was due to their global impact that year.  Humanitarians leaders have also earned the title.   Jobs was neither villain nor humanitarian.  

    Jobs/Apple are a money machine hell bent on not just dominating, but controlling content and user experiences — With a laser-focus on upscale, niche consumers (with the exception of the iPod; which, in it’s own right, redistributed the wealth of the music industry into Apple’s own coffers).  They’ve become the Thought Police.

    If I’m not mistaken, Apple dumped their philanthropy and educational initiatives back in the late-90’s and went on to amass piles of money while outsourcing more and more labour.  Labour conditions in China are well documented.

    Pretty, shiny devices?  Fun movies? Sure, SONY does the same, without the fanboism.

    Again, no.

    I think of Apple no differently than robotic vacuums at this point.  Cool.  But, a big “so what?”  I have zero interest in paying an extra 30-40% for the logo.

  • Hello

    Steve Jobs started the touch-revolution. Of course he deserves it.

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