Blueseed says it will offer living and office space in an elegantly designed modern tech environment

Now, we’ve heard some wild concepts over the years. But the latest idea getting some buzz in Silicon Valley (not to mention cash from well known angel investor Peter Thiel) goes a bit off the deep end.

An organization by the name of Blueseed Co. is proposing a “visa-free offshore incubator” — housed in renovated cruise ships or barges — 12 miles off the shores of San Francisco.

Crazy? Maybe. But the company is pushing forward with the concept, writing on its Web site:

Our facilities will be a short ferry ride away from Silicon Valley so that great ideas and talent from around the world can live, work, and play while having convenient access to the San Francisco Bay Area. We will provide a customized environment centered around smart, proven, cost-effective legal best practices, and modern living and work accommodations.

The renovated cruise ships or barges (the company’s Web site has multiple renderings of the possible facilities) could house up to 1,000 tech workers.

The project is estimated to cost between $10 million to $30 million, with a launch date of 2013, reports The Huffington Post.

Fox News is already calling it “The Love Boat for entrepreneurs,” while Blueseed CEO Max Marty dubs it the “Googleplex of the sea.”

Running a startup has its own set of challenges, but creating a new business on the high seas comes with added risk factors. Blueseed addresses everything from tsunamis to pirates to seasickness in a FAQ on its site.

What do you think? Could high-tech incubators one day take to the high seas in an entrepreneurial flotilla of sorts? And, if so, should Seattle jump on board?

After all, we’ve got plenty of water nearby, and even a few unused aircraft carriers sitting out in Bremerton.

Here’s Marty — the son of Cuban immigrants who received an MBA from the University of Miami– talking about the idea with Fox News.

Comments

  • Guest

    Congratulations! These sort of (literal) offshore operations will be an excellent way to do business without the drudgeries of government bureaucracy. Imagine a world where work gets done without the tedia of visas and taxes!

  • Guest

    Doesn’t it seem kinds of ironic that a startup factory that will probably be focused almost entirely on the “cloud” needs to be physically located in proximity to Silicon Valley?

  • Lawrence Lam

    Beware the pirates!

  • Guest

    Awesome. The plantation reinvented. A digital plantation, if you will. Recruit cheap labor from overseas, work ‘em hard, and whatever you do make sure to keep them segregated. We don’t want their kind mixing with ours. /s

  • http://profiles.google.com/clive.boulton clive boulton

    SV offshore @davemcclure gets a new eye http://youtu.be/KOWckOfARBE

  • http://profiles.google.com/clive.boulton clive boulton

    SV offshore @davemcclure gets a new eye http://youtu.be/KOWckOfARBE

  • Vijayv

    In a way shows thinking out of the box. Of course from startups to GE have found what they consider the labor force where ever the people. Finally we should the best working for us versus against us. So I feel this is cool.

  • Lance Bowman
  • Anthony Alfidi

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