Lost and found for the QR code generation? Dynotag helps find lost luggage, pets and more

QR codes are becoming an increasingly popular way to get information on places or products in the real world, including restaurants, historical landmarks and more.

But even though an estimated 14 million Americans scanned a QR code last June, the technology has yet to go mainstream. A Seattle startup by the name of Dynotag is hoping to change that, making it simple for the layperson to set up a QR tag and place it on a variety of personal products. (Think luggage, a pet’s collar or a mobile phone).

“We started with a simple question: ‘Why can’t someone quickly create a tag linked to online content they create?’” said Dynotag CEO Murat Divringi, a software engineer who previously worked at CacheFlow and Emulex Network Systems.

Divringi, a Seattle area angel investor, is bankrolling the startup himself. Based in Seattle, it currently has two full time staffers, plus a network of contractors working on the project.

Dynotags are free to create and use, with the links in the QR code taking users to a variety of content forms, including Facebook pages, online coupons, video messages, etc.

The company is also offering premium tags for $4.99 or 20 tags for $49.99. Those tags include additional customization, more storage, PIN numbers and the ability to receive a notification in case someone actually reads the tag.

We’ve seen a number of Seattle area startups look to capitalize on the growth of QR codes, including mobile app Pirq and business review site Judy’s Book. Seattle’s PetHub.com also uses QR codes to help track down lost dogs and cats.

  • Guest101

    I really don’t see the point using QR codes for Lost & Found situations.  Why not just put your name and email or phone number in the same space you put your QR code.  Everyone understands what a phone number means.  Not everyone will know what a QR code is and how to deal with it.

    • Jane

      There are a few advantages to using QR codes – not limited to pet applications – some are:

      - You can update the base information

      - You can hide the information and not advertise your phone number, etc. by disabling the tag until you need it.
      - You can get a text message when the tag is scanned, showing the approximate location of where the content was accessed and the exact time.

      - You can attach a full document as tag content, showing allergies, medical conditions, etc. as well as color photos and what have you.

      - You can associate the same information in more than one cases (kids, anyone?)

      All these, for peanuts. It may be of interest to some people. 

      • Draper

        *yawn* this is still overkill.  My luggage doesn’t have allergies.

        • Jane

          Does it always show the current destination you are flying to?
          Can you update its contents after checking into the plane?
          Can you post a reward on the tag after you lose it?

          If so, you are right – you do not need one.

          Some others may.

          • Draper

            No, my luggage tag doesn’t show where I’m flying to.  But the Airline tag does.  After I check in, who has ever thought “Oh man, I forgot to add I included my pair of Calvin Klein underwear and favorite pair of socks”?? — and whoever posts rewards for lost luggage???  So I guess, yes, I do not need one.  But good luck!  My thing here is that just because technology can do something, doesn’t mean it should, or we need it.  But keep trying.

          • Jane

            You keep airline tags on your luggage, backpack, etc.  all the time. OK.
            Don’t understand the socks.
            Rewards for lost backpacks, laptops, etc. are posted all the time.
            It seems that you are not interested in the potential applications or want to think about it, just want to knock it. So be it.
            Best of luck in your endeavors as well.

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100004259317800 Facebook User

      Because certain persons want to remain anonymous, as the stars, you know…

  • Guest101

    I really don’t see the point using QR codes for Lost & Found situations.  Why not just put your name and email or phone number in the same space you put your QR code.  Everyone understands what a phone number means.  Not everyone will know what a QR code is and how to deal with it.