KindleGraph's Evan Jacobs at the Lean Startup Meetup in Seattle

It was speed pitching on steroids Wednesday night as a group of die-hard startup junkies packed into the basement of the TechStars headquarters for the Lean Startup Seattle meetup. A mind-numbing array of thirty startup companies pitched their wares, but at the end of the day only one could be champ.

The event started with 15-second pitches from the entrepreneurs — including one very creative haiku from Chewsy co-founder Chaitanya Sareen. (Not sure what to eat? Chewsy shows you dish reviews. Download the free app!)

Fifteen seconds isn’t a lot of time to pitch a business, so the haiku route was an exceptional idea.

Here’s a look at the 11 finalists, chosen by a judging panel of venture capitalists Lucinda Stewart, Michelle Goldberg, Greg Gottesman and Andy Sack. We know the winner, but we’re not saying yet as we’d like to know which is your favorite of the one-minute pitches.

iSnazzMedia:


ComputeNext:


NorthByNine:


Apptentive:


Raveld:


Chewsy:


SittingAround:


Toolz.me:


KindleGraph:


HoloHoloHey:


MountainLogic:


So, now’s your time to sound off. Which pitch did you like the best?

Comments

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Robert-Melick/43202689 Robert Melick

    In a one minute presentation, first impression is everything.  Before watching all of these videos and doing my own judging.  I decided to use three criteria, in this order.

    1. Is the pitch interesting and engaging? Or Do I like the energy and excitement the person has? – If within the first 15 seconds I wasn’t impressed with the individual and their energy I stopped the video and moved on.

    2. Did they give me a brief description of not what their product was, but how was it useful.  If at the 30 sec. mark I didn’t have the answer to what the product was and how it would better my life, or the life of my friends/colleagues I moved on.

    3.  Lastly, I wanted to see a call to action.  In the closing moments I looked for a way to get started with their company.  If you held my attention and got me interested I wanted a quick 5 sec. blurb about where to go and how to get started.  That way as soon as that video was over I could cntrl t for a new tab and right away (not having to do extensive googling) learn more.

    So in my very inexperienced and unprofessional opinion, my winner is Toolz.me as it met all the criteria most excellently.

    Great job everyone.  It is quite awesome and inspiring, especially for a young and very green professional like myself, to see the Seattle startup community in action.

    • johnhcook

      Great analysis Robert. Like how you broke this down. Wonder how you would have judged the 15 second pitches? :)

      • http://www.facebook.com/people/Robert-Melick/43202689 Robert Melick

        That would have been a much tougher call :) My criteria would likely have to be much revised and shortened.  I would probably feel a much stronger pull towards the emotion and personality aspects.  Make me like you, and give me the 10 second tagline.  If I like you and your tagline is something I’d use, I’ll probably check you out further on my own.

        However, at 15 seconds I’m almost certainly going to watch your entire pitch (I’ve always got time for 15 seconds) So an argument could be made for supplying maximum info.  I still think I’d navigate towards the personality and energy though.

  • Anonymous

    Thanks for posting these videos John. They happened so fast in person it was sort of a blur.  

    Great meeting you as well. It was a fun event for @kickofflabs to sponsor. 

  • Anonymous

    Thanks for posting these videos John. They happened so fast in person it was sort of a blur.  

    Great meeting you as well. It was a fun event for @kickofflabs to sponsor. 

  • Anonymous

    Spoiler alert: Kindlegraph didn’t win but I was grateful for the opportunity to present. One day I hope to be as good at pitching as Chaitanya from Chewsy.

  • Anonymous

    Spoiler alert: Kindlegraph didn’t win but I was grateful for the opportunity to present. One day I hope to be as good at pitching as Chaitanya from Chewsy.

  • http://twitter.com/khanklatt Khan Klatt

    In my book, it was a run off between Toolz.me and Chewsy. Both of them quickly identified the problem they’re trying to solve (application overload, what to order), and the ideal outcome (apps you need to know about, food you should order), and a simple path to get there (application/food recommendations). The reason Chewsy wins in my book is he got it done in about 50 seconds (sorry Red!).
    In fact, I liked Chewsy’s pitch so much, that I wrote a blog post concocting a formula from  Chaitanya’s pitch. http://www.khan.org/blog/how-to-pitch-your-startup-in-one-minute

  • http://twitter.com/khanklatt Khan Klatt

    In my book, it was a run off between Toolz.me and Chewsy. Both of them quickly identified the problem they’re trying to solve (application overload, what to order), and the ideal outcome (apps you need to know about, food you should order), and a simple path to get there (application/food recommendations). The reason Chewsy wins in my book is he got it done in about 50 seconds (sorry Red!).
    In fact, I liked Chewsy’s pitch so much, that I wrote a blog post concocting a formula from  Chaitanya’s pitch. http://www.khan.org/blog/how-to-pitch-your-startup-in-one-minute

  • http://www.facebook.com/cellartracker Eric LeVine

    Nice job Chaitanya!

  • http://www.facebook.com/cellartracker Eric LeVine

    Nice job Chaitanya!

  • http://www.facebook.com/cellartracker Eric LeVine

    Nice job Chaitanya!

  • http://www.ramble0n.com Taylor Dance

    Both Chewsy and Toolz.me were on the right path. All did a relatively effective job in pitching their products, but those two have the most novel idea, effective presentation, and a solution that seems implementable and adoptable to a problem that is relevant and applicable. I agree with Robert, if I wasn’t already logically following the product development and implementation by the 30 second mark, I was disinterested. I don’t care about your fancy presenstation skills- those are great but the product or service is what will make or break the company.

  • Mike Anderson

    My top picks:

    Chewsy –  interesting concept … taking restaurant reviews to a more granular level. Yelp doesn’t learn / react from my actions, comments and ratings.  If Chewsy can pull that off, they have a hit.

    Apptentive  (obvious need – can they monitize it)

  • Mike Anderson

    My top picks:

    Chewsy –  interesting concept … taking restaurant reviews to a more granular level. Yelp doesn’t learn / react from my actions, comments and ratings.  If Chewsy can pull that off, they have a hit.

    Apptentive  (obvious need – can they monitize it)

  • http://www.thoughtful.co Chris Lynch

    Chewsy was my favorite! Of course I also learned that I talk too much for too long :) Short pitches are hard! Good job everyone.

  • http://www.thoughtful.co Chris Lynch

    Chewsy was my favorite! Of course I also learned that I talk too much for too long :) Short pitches are hard! Good job everyone.

  • http://twitter.com/RedRussak ‘Red’ Russak

    They were all my favorite! ;) Seriously, last night was insane. Thank you Seattle for incredible support. And lets hear it one more time for our Judges ;)

  • http://trevinchow.com/blog Trevin

    Thanks for the kind words about Chewsy everyone! We were glad to have the opportunity to pitch at such a great event and meet a bunch of you in person.  If you haven’t already tried the app, download it now at http://www.chewsy.com :)

  • Vbillma

    I liked north by nine because it makes great business sense for customers and businesses. It is tough to match the wants of a customer with a product and this technology seems to really get it.

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