Steve Jobs appears to have made peace with Microsoft’s Bill Gates by the end of the Apple co-founder’s life, with the two men spending more than three hours reminiscing together in May, according to a New York Times report on the soon-to-be-released Steve Jobs biography by Walter Isaacson.

But the Apple co-founder also didn’t mince any words in sharing his thoughts on Gates for the book.

The Huffington Post, which also obtained the biography, quotes this line: “Bill is basically unimaginative and has never invented anything, which is why I think he’s more comfortable now in philanthropy than technology. He just shamelessly ripped off other people’s ideas.”

And also this one: “He’d be a broader guy if he had dropped acid once or gone off to an ashram when he was younger.”

The book also shows Jobs to be extremely pissed about Google’s move into mobile phones through its work on Android, calling it “grand theft” of Apple’s iPhone design. The Associated Press, which also got an advance copy, has more on that topic in this story.

As we learned with Paul Allen’s “Idea Man,” these early excerpts can provide an incomplete picture of the larger book, but it’s clear that the Jobs biography provides unvarnished take on Jobs’ competitors, at least, and presumably of the man himself, as well.

60 Minutes will air an interview with Isaacson on Sunday (preview here). The book comes out Monday.

Previously: Bill Gates: Working with Steve Jobs was ‘an insanely great honor’

Comments

  • Guest

    Congratulations to Steve on getting the last word in on Bill Gates and Google! I look forward to Bill’s acid-induced attempt at a rejoinder.

    • Guest

      Gates has already been quoted with some rather unflattering commentary of his own, which is unfortunate. He should have stayed on the high road. People are starting to see the real Steve Jobs and it’s not a pretty picture.

    • Guest

      Gates has already been quoted with some rather unflattering commentary of his own, which is unfortunate. He should have stayed on the high road. People are starting to see the real Steve Jobs and it’s not a pretty picture.

      • Sarah_gilbert

        This is what he was. A Cry baby. He thought everyone copied him. Such an idiot.

        • Anonymous

          Jobs and Apple I never liked anyways.

      • Sarah_gilbert

        This is what he was. A Cry baby. He thought everyone copied him. Such an idiot.

  • Guest

    Congratulations to Steve on getting the last word in on Bill Gates and Google! I look forward to Bill’s acid-induced attempt at a rejoinder.

  • http://www.jrotech.com/ Jeff Rodenburg

    Now that the news of Jobs’s passing has settled in, sure seems we’re hearing more and more stories come out that don’t put him in the best light. I doubt Jobs would see it that way, but I think it’s unfortunate.

  • http://www.jrotech.com/ Jeff Rodenburg

    Now that the news of Jobs’s passing has settled in, sure seems we’re hearing more and more stories come out that don’t put him in the best light. I doubt Jobs would see it that way, but I think it’s unfortunate.

    • john

      Why is it unfortunate? If the guy comes across negatively due to things he said, then deal with it. 

      • http://www.jrotech.com/ Jeff Rodenburg

        He did some brilliant things in this industry, but those achievements are going to be muted to a certain extent by a lot of petty things he decided to focus on.

        It’s unfortunate for all of us because we end up talking about things that are negative, not positive.

        As for his comments, I find them completely selfish. For a guy that supposedly found enlightenment in his final years, he sounds like the same ass he was when we he was younger.

    • john

      Why is it unfortunate? If the guy comes across negatively due to things he said, then deal with it. 

    • Guest

      I see it differently. For most of the past decade the technology media has been in love with anything Apple. They generally didn’t subject the company, its products, or its leader, to the same level of  rigor and snarkiness that is routinely doled out for say MS. Along the way, Jobs was transformed into a caricature of the enlightened, thoughtful genius, that bore little resemblance to what he was really like.

      I actually find it kind of fitting that years of Apple’s consummate PR efforts are being destroyed by his own words.

      And frankly I think it’s healthy for a sense of the real Jobs to emerge, rather than this PR creation. it doesn’t take anything away from what he accomplished, which is a lot. But it does provide a more accurate view for posterity.

  • http://twitter.com/moniguzman Monica Guzman

    It’s been fascinating to see a person and his personality rise above even the biggest, more powerful companies in the public imagination lately. Goes to show that no matter how cool a technology, how powerful a company, the most amazing thing in the universe really is a human being.

    • Guest

      Really? I see it more like cult status, when in reality Jobs alone isn’t responsible for Apple’s tremendous rise from the ashes. He may have played the most important individual role, but it was a team effort. And I don’t it’s particularly healthy that Apple’s success is so closely linked to Jobs. It gives him far too much credit and all the other contributors far too little.

  • http://twitter.com/moniguzman Monica Guzman

    It’s been fascinating to see a person and his personality rise above even the biggest, more powerful companies in the public imagination lately. Goes to show that no matter how cool a technology, how powerful a company, the most amazing thing in the universe really is a human being.

  • Anonymous

    jobs took a low road insulting bill. jobs is a horrible man both when alive and dead.

  • http://ClaussConcept.com Jason Gerard Clauss

    What an ass. I never was a fan when he was alive and I’m not going to pretend I’m one now that he’s dead.

  • Lisa Cherkofsky

    Jobs left Apple as a cell phone company. For an industry segment that rotates its favored phone every several years, not sure that is a good thing for Apples long term success. Job didn’t invent the cell phone but maybe he thought he did.

    • Guest

      That’s not really accurate. iPhone is the biggest contributor now, but they have many other successful businesses, some with huge potential in front of them (iPad). I don’t think you’d find too many leading technology companies who wouldn’t happily swap their business and positioning for Apple’s. Even if iPhone’s share of the smartphone market continues to decline, Apple is assured of strong growth for years to come, unlike many including MS.

  • Johnplay26

    Jobs on the Macintosh:

    “Good artists copy, great artists steal”.

    Jobs on Android:

    “Our lawsuit is saying, ‘Google you fucking ripped off the iPhone, wholesale ripped us off.’ I will spend my last dying breath if I need to, and I will spend every penny of Apple’s $40 billion in the bank, to right this wrong. I’m going to destroy Android, because it’s a stolen product.”

  • Bastiaan

    He is right about his product getting copied but its logical because his ideas where so good and revolutionary. I dont agree with many negative comments here, Jobs had a point.

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