Teenage entrepreneurs, PopCap in play and other comments of the week

It was an epic week here at GeekWire. Not only did more than 800 people (including Sir Mix-A-Lot, Detlef Schrempf, Jenni Hogan and Seattle Sounders’ Brad Evans and Pat Noonan) come out to the official GeekWire launch bash on Wednesday night, but we also kicked off our weekend radio show with 97.3 KIRO FM. Thanks again to you — our readers, listeners, contributors and commenters — for helping to make it possible.

Amidst all of the controlled chaos of the past week, there was still plenty of news to cover. Here are a few of the stories that drove discussion on GeekWire:


An acquisition of PopCap Games probably makes a little more sense than an initial public offering, but we were surprised by the reported $1 billion purchase price that could be put on the table for the Seattle game maker.  The TechCrunch scoop sparked a lot of speculation about the buyer, with reports later in the week that Electronic Arts was the primary suitor. One reader thought that Disney would make a nice fit for PopCap.

“Would be the best way to solidify a dominant place on that market. Also the only way to make sure you are always ahead of Zynga.”

Full story and discussion: Report: Mystery buyer acquiring PopCap for more than $1B


One of the most popular stories of the week on GeekWire was our interview with 15-year-old entrepreneur Daniil Kulchenko who sold his startup company, Phenona, to ActiveState earlier this month. Most agreed with reader David Robins:

“I am proud of this kid! Great job.”

Full story and discussion: Q&A: Meet the 15-year-old who just sold his tech startup


Seattle entrepreneur Bob Crimmins sparked a thoughtful discussion after penning a guest post about how every entrepreneur should approach their startup as if it won’t be their last. Evan Jacobs responded:

“It seems to me that when beginning any endeavor whether it’s a new business or a new relationship that the important thing is to focus on the process (i.e. the day to day activities) and not the outcome because the process is the only thing that you can completely control. It might turn out that this business (or this relationship) might be the last one that I ever start but it seems that focusing too much on the outcome would distract me from what I need to do everyday.”

Full story and discussion: Think like a serial entrepreneur


And, finally, a few readers noted that Matt Heinz forgot an important point in his guest column about time wasters at work. Reader David Reeves quipped:

“For us, it’s sending dog photos to geekwire :-)”

Full story and discussion: 12 Time Wasters That Will Kill Your Startup’s Productivity


Thanks to everyone for tuning in and posting comments. Looking forward to another exciting week in tech.