It’s not just Kindles and tablets in the news from Amazon this morning. The Seattle company is also announcing a new web browser, dubbed Amazon Silk, that makes use of its Amazon Web Services cloud computing infrastructure in a bid for a more efficient browsing experience under the hood.

Here’s an excerpt from an Amazon blog post introducing the new browser.

Instead of a device-siloed software application, Amazon Silk deploys a split-architecture.  All of the browser subsystems are present on your Kindle Fire as well as on the AWS cloud computing platform.  Each time you load a web page, Silk makes a dynamic decision about which of these subsystems will run locally and which will execute remotely.

But if you’re looking forward to trying this on a computer, it looks like you’ll be out of luck, unless some homebrew developers can figure it out. Amazon is exclusive to Kindle Fire, the $199 tablet announced by the company this morning.

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos says in a news release: “We refactored and rebuilt the browser software stack and now push pieces of the computation into the AWS cloud. When you use Silk — without thinking about it or doing anything explicit — you’re calling on the raw computational horsepower of Amazon EC2 to accelerate your web browsing.”

Amazon is also hiring for the Silk development team. Here’s the pitch from a job listing for a Silk software development engineer position:

Imagine the possibilities when a web browser is powered by a vast, scalable server fleet, massive network connections, and limitless storage resources. Can you think of ways to use those assets to make the browsing experience faster or to introduce previously impossible features?

Related Posts: Picture: This is the Kindle Fire … Kindle Tablet will be $199, undercutting iPad price.

Comments

  • Matthew Williams

    You know.  AOL use to do this back in the day.  If you remember they use to serve all of their internet traffic from one location and apply a compression logic to all images that came accross to speed up dial up connections.  This is obviously much smarter and on a much more powerful platform (EC2).

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